From NC to NYC.. Becoming a New York Woman

Everyone knows that where you are from in large part makes you the person you are.  The person you become is a result of where you choose to take your life.  Being from a small town in North Carolina, I was brought up exactly how one might suspect.  I was taught religion, good manners, and how to be a lady.  Coming from a family of good, hardworking, respectable people meant I had a solid foundation towards a nice future.

As I mentioned in my first post, I had wanted to move to New York from the time I was a child.  This dream stemmed from a family vacation with my friend Heather.  Her family took me with them to New York when I was eleven years old, and from that moment I never saw the world the same.  My town was so small, and as much as I loved it there, I had been exposed to something so much bigger and I was forever obsessed.  It was so glamorous and larger than life.  I didn’t know why, but I wanted to be a part of it.  I remember seeing the women wearing sneakers with their suits, carrying their heels in their handbags, and thinking, “I want to be like those women.”

Both my parents are college educated which set the tone for that course of my life. There was never a doubt that I would go to college.  I wanted to be in a city, so I chose to go to the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.  I spent eight years in Charlotte, four in school and four working there after I graduated.  I certainly needed Charlotte as a buffer for the most culturally diverse city on the planet.  Prior to Charlotte I had very little exposure to other cultures.  In my hometown, it seemed everyone was Christian, and either white, black, or Latino.   Charlotte has a mix of all types of race, religion, and culture.  My time spent there prepared me insurmountably for my move here.  Without that buffer I do not know if I would have adjusted as well as I have.

I find my personal evolution quite interesting, which is a major part of why I started this blog.  My foundation was built on morals and manners- so no matter what changes I go through, that part of me stays the same.  I always try my very hardest to do the right thing and be polite.  My time in Charlotte educated me on different types of people and how to relate and adapt.  I adjusted my Southern accent to be more neutral.  In addition, I worked there in sales for 4 years, so I learned how to be a woman in business.  Now that I am in New York, I have already noticed some changes.  I’m more assertive and opinionated for sure, but I still practice good manners and wear my heart on my sleeve.  I give to the poor when I can, I smile at everyone, and  I offer my seat on the train if someone seems like they need it more than me.  That’s just how I was raised.

I am still evolving and hopefully always will be. You have to take life one step at a time, and the key is to keep dreaming.  Don’t ever think it is silly to believe in your dreams, because they do come true.  I know this because I am now a New York woman who wears sneakers on her walk to work and carries her heels in her handbag- and I can’t help but smile when I see a little girl watching me as I pass by.
IMG_5472                                                         Me with my mama circa 1991

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6 thoughts on “From NC to NYC.. Becoming a New York Woman

  1. I love reading your post! I’ve certainly thought often about the opportunity one day down the road of living in a place where I would be surrounded by a diverse group of people. I found that to be one of the best things about spending 4 years at UNC Chapel Hill. I’m happy for my girls that they have chosen to stay in the triangle area! Honestly it’s quite often frustrating to feel like my beliefs and convictions and not shared by so many where I live and go to work and that I should just keep those things to myself. So Kudos to you for living the adventure that few will choose. I’m proud of you and happy for you and glad that I get to have a glimpse into your life! Take care and keep blogging!

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    1. Thank you Lesley. That means a lot. I see from what you share on Facebook that you and I seem to have similar views. I know my mom feels the way you do a lot of the time when it comes to popular opinion in the south– in fact, she definitely chooses to keep her opinions to herself because a lot of times people are not tolerant of them which can be frustrating. It’s encouraging to know that their are people in RC with open minds/hearts. I appreciate you reading my blog!

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  2. This is so well written by such a wonderful young lady. I always thought you were the prettiest sweetest little girl and look at you now – New York City! I’m happy for you!

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  3. I have always wanted to move to NYC since my first visit there as a 12 year old– I came out of The Lion King, turned to my parents, and said, “I’m living here someday”. Thank you for reminding me of this dream and reinvigorating me to go after it!

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